Lakehurst AFB

Location
Formally known as Naval Air Engineering Station (NAES), Lakehurst is located only 25 miles from McGuire and Dix AFB on the eastern portion of Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, NJ and sits on 7,400 of the joint base’s 42,000 acres.

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History – Lakehurst

NAES Lakehurst dates back to 1917, when the command was established as the Naval Aircraft Factory. Because aircraft manufacturers were too busy building planes for the Army, the Navy decided to build the only aircraft factory ever to be completely owned and operated by the U.S. Government. After breaking ground in Philadelphia in August 1917, the first plane, an H-16 Flying Boat, flew off to war eight months later. By the end of World War I, aircraft were coming off the line at the rate of two airplanes per day. Experimental research and development of new types of airplanes was the thrust after the war. Nearly 1000 of the famed N3N “Yellow Peril” airplanes were built here before and during World War II. A total of 1,407 airplanes of six types were produced during World War II, as were 1,300 aircraft engines. Hangars 5 and 6, built in 1943, are among the largest single-arch wooden structures in the world.

In 1962, the center became the Naval Air Engineering Center. It was reorganized in 1967 with various functions moving to several different locations. In 1973, NAEC was transferred to Naval Air Station Lakehurst. In 1977, existing Lakehurst commands were consolidated with NAEC, with NAEC as the host command. In 1992 the NAEC became the Naval Air Engineering Station, Lakehurst, NJ. Lakehurst is most well known as the site of the 1937 crash of the hydrogen powered dirigible, the Hindenburg. On 30 September 2009, a formal ceremony was held to decommission NAES Lakehurst. On 1 October, 2009, Lakehurst formally merged to become Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst.

Population Served

Lakehurst supports over 2875 active duty, guard and reserve, family members and civilian personnel. In addition, there are more than 60,000 retirees within a 50 mile radius of Joint Base-McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst.

Base Transportation

Currently, there is no base transportation on this installation.

Sponsorship

Lakehurst has a sponsor coordinator whose job it is to designate a sponsor. A sponsor’s responsibility is to meet newcomers, escort them through the base and to make the transition as easy as possible. Contact the Command Sponsor Coordinator or Military Admin at 732-323-2656. Inbound service members should expect a letter or e-mail from the sponsor. The Command Sponsor Coordinator will forward a message and a Welcome Aboard Package.

Temporary Quarters

Service members and families under orders should make advance reservations at the All American Inn (formally Combined Bachelor Housing facility (CBH)) by calling 732-323-2266.

Pets are not allowed. Call CBH at the above telephone number for guidance on lodging in the Lakehurst area that accommodates pets.

Relocation Assistance

The MFSC Relocation Assistance Program, 488-2Highway 547, 732-323-1248 has a Loan Closet for in and out-processing military members and their families. Services include loan locker items, Welcome Aboard Packages, local area information, Smooth Move Workshops and individual guidance about the area. We have maps of the area and list of local resources.

Critical Installation Information – Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst

  • All homes have been renovated or replaced with newly constructed homes. Privatization will provide families with access to quality homes in well-planned communities on Dix, McGuire and Lakehurst.
  • The costs for automobile insurance and off-base housing are extremely high.
  • Free pre-school programs are available for children three and four years of age for children new to the Dix or McGuire communities.
  • School of choice for Dix and McGuire residents (Pemberton Township or Northern Burlington)
  • Cost of off-base housing and car insurance are extremely high in this area. Do not assume your insurance company will be willing or able to insure your automobile in New Jersey.